Titre: "Sandy MacVicar Worth Knowing" 1916 (from Mary-Louise Pickering Thomson scrapbooks)
Auteur:
Source: Archives of Manitoba, P6648/3, Item 2, Scrapbook April 1915 - Dec 1927, p5
Page 1 of 1

Transcription

“Sandy MACVICAR –
WORTH KNOWING”
TRIBUTE TO FORMER PORTAGE BOY
WHO LOST HIS LIFE IN
FRANCE
The Largs and Millpost [Millport] Weekly
News of Sept. [September] 16, 1916, contains
the following tribute to Sandy Mac
Vicar, a former Portage boy and son
of Mr. D. MacVicar of Portage Plains
being an extract from an article en-
titled “Platoon Chums I have lost”
by Private George P. Simpson, 17th H. L. I.: --
“Sandy MacVicar, one of our few
men who died of wounds, was a
man whom it took a long time to
know, but he was worth knowing.
Always straight in his dealing, and
having very little to say as a rule,
Sandy was a man to be relied on,
and when he did speak it was us-
ually to the point. About the first
time we had any experience of Ger-
man trench mortars and “oil cans”
Sandy was on the firestop nearest
which they were landing, and by
his side the “nipper” a lad who
said he was nineteen. The explos-
ion so near was, of course, terrify-
ing, and the young lad got a bit
excited and looked as if he would
run away. Sandy noted the fact,
and when the next one burst nearer
still, he caught the youth by the
shoulders, saying, with the peculiar
accent which years of life in Canada
had given him, “you young devil,
if you leave here I’ll shoot you—
keep by me and you’ll be all right”.
There you had a man with confi-
dence in himself, and helping in
that way others in the sentry group.
But that was just the impression you
gained from his strong and healthy
appearance. Weilding [Wielding] an axe as to
the manner born, he was admired
of all, when, in the winter time we
had to chop wood for our braziers
at night. We lost Sandy early in
the fight, he being wounded in the
back, and although he must have
been suffering great pain it did not
keep him from asking some of us as
we passed, “How goes the fight,
are we advancing?” and he seem-
ed cheered to know that we were
making progress.
He was a great loss to us as a
man, but a greater loss to our fight-
ing strength. They got him down
at night to the hospital in the vil-
lage behind the lines, but the next
night he succumbed and was buried
in a little cemetery close by.

THE LATE PRIVATE
ALEXANDER MACVICAR

WENT TO OLD COUNTRY TO ENLIST—
SERVED WITH HIGHLAND
LIGTH INFANTRY

The Graphic yesterday anounc-
ed the death, “Killed in Action:”
of a Portage boy, Alexander Mac-
Vicar, son of Mr. and Mrs. D.
MacVicar.
Private MacVicar came to Port-
age from Scotland with his parents
when about 15 years of age, and for
8 years was employed as engineer
by the C. P. R. at Outlook, Sask.
In November 1911 he left his em-
ployment and went at his own ex-
pense to the Old Country and join-
ed the Highland Light Infantry,
17th Battalion, at Glasgow, and for
nearly a year was under training in
various parts of Scotland and En-
gland. He went to France the
early part of November 1915, and
had been at the front ever since,
escaping injury until killed on July
the 1st at the battle of Albert.
The regiment to which Private
MacVicar belonged was mentioned
in the dispatches of Sir Douglas
Haig as playing an important part in the fight.
Mr. and Mrs. MacVicar have the
sympathy of the community in
their bereavement. Private Mac-
Vicar was not married.

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