Titre: "How We Didn't Use to Win" in One Big Union Bulletin, Vol.1, No. 1, 1 May 1919
Auteur:
Source: Archives of Manitoba, MG 14 A18, Winnipeg General Strike 1919, File 3
Page 1 of 1

Transcription

How We didn't Use to Win.
Formerly when a wage slave had a grievance he complained, and if his
grievance was not redressed he would at time become wild and agitated and say
things, whereat his boss would "can" him and employ another wage slave.
After a time, this being an experience of all wage slaves in a given
trade or workshop, collective bargaining was resorted to. At first the boss was
dicomfitted, but as the field of labor which he exploited became international,
he used craft against craft and workshop against workshop as he had formerly
used individual against individual, and so got the upper hand.
Industrial unionism embraces the uttermost man within the uttermost limits
of this earth and as the boss can get no farther, he is - so to speak- "up against it".
The old unionist based his philosophy and morality in the sacred rights
of private property in things socially used. He believed in a fair day's wage for
a fair day's works. A fair rate of interest, a fair margin of profit and reasonable
rent. He wouldn't hit a boss below the belt and if the boss put the belt around the
crown of his head he wouldn't hit him at all. He wouldn't go out on a strike before
giving the boss sufficient notice to cancel contracts, refuse fresh agreeements, hire
scabs, or in other ways get ready for the conflict.
The the old unionists would walk out of the workshop, lift their hats
respectfully to the boss, and apologize if their heads should happen to break a
policeman's club.
They would stay out on strike for weeks and eat up the union funds, saved
in the preceding thirty years; then they would perforce practise of starving stunt,
and when tired of that would go back to work and sign the pledge not to strike again for
anybody.
The new Morality
The new morality says:
Damn interest; Damn rents:
Damn profits: Damn agreements:

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