Title: Letter of 30 March 1896 from Clifford Sifton and J. D. Cameron to Arthur R. Dickey, Alphonse Desjardines, and Donald A. Smith
Author: Sifton, Clifford, Sir, 1861-1929
Source: Archives of Manitoba, MG14 B41, Clifford Sifton - Affidavits, etc. re: Manitoba School Question
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Transcription

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deem it due to ourselves to protest against the course thus
pursued by the Government by which you were commissioned.
We regret that we are unable to accede to the terms
of the proposition submitted to us. A study of its details
reveal the fact that it involves much more than would ap-
pear at first sight. The objections are both general, that is
to say, as to principles involved, and special, that is to say,
as to practical operations.
An amendment to the School act embodying the terms
of the memorandum would divide the population for educational
purposes into two classes, Roman Catholic and Protestant,
giving to the Roman Catholic population distinct and special
privileges as against the remaining portion of the people.
It would establish a system of State supported Separate
schools for the Roman Catholice people, and would compel their
support by the school taxes and Legislative Grants. Not only
so, but the whole school organisation--text book regulations,
consitution of Advisory Board, Boards of Examiners and Normal
School, --would be modified to bring it into accord with the
separation principle to an extent not usual even in places
where regularly constitued separate school systems obtain.
In the Order-in-Council of the twentieth December,
1896 transmitted to the Federal Government as embodying the
views of the Manitoba Government upon the question, it is
stated that the proposal to establish a system of State aid-
ed separate schools in any form cannot be agreed to. That
Order-in-Council was taken as the basis of the policy of the
Government upon the question in the late General Provincial
Election, and upon it the Government was sustained. It is
clear therefore that we are precluded from accepting the pro-

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