Title: Letter of 28 January 1921 from F. J. Dixon to A. Meighen and Hugh Guthrie
Author: Dixon, F. J. (Frederick John), 1881-1931
Source: Archives of Manitoba MG14 B25 2/2 – Fred J. Dixon File with letters
Page 1 of 1

Transcription

Winnipeg, Man., Jan. 28, 1921.
Hon. A. Meighen
The Hon. Hugh Guthrie
Minister of Justice
Ottawa, Ontario
Dear Sir:-
As Leader of the Labor Group in the Legislative
Assembly of Manitoba, I have been requested to call your
attention to the fact that the session here will commence
on February 10th, and to remind you that there are certain
members, _ William Ivens, John Queen and George Armstrong,-
who will be unable to attend unless your Government makes
it possible for them so to do.
These men, together with W. Pritchard and R. JohnsText,
are serving sentence in the Manitoba Provincial Gaol, and I
believe their terms will expire on February 28th, with thim
off for good conduct. You may remember that a deputation
representing the elected Labor Members of Manitoba and
Ontario visited Ottawa last summer to request the release
of these men. We urged then that it would not be good
policy to insist that they serve the full term imposed
upon them. We still hold that view.
We would emphasize at this time the discontent
that is likely to be aroused in the minds of the voters who
elected these men to public office, if they find their
elected representatives are barred from performing their
public function.
We repeat our request for the release of the five
men before mentionned. If you will not comply with this
request, we suggest that you make some arrangement by which
Messrs. Ivens, Queen, and Armstrong may attend the session of
the Legislative Assembly and discharge their duties to the
electors of Winnipeg.
Perhaps I should add that I saw the men yesterday,
and, while they do not feel inclined to ask for any reduction
of sentence, Messrs, Ivens, Queen and Armstrong intimated
that they would appreciate such and arrangement as I have
suggested.
Your truly,
411 Rosedale Avenue.

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